10912 West Blix St., No. Hollywood

Up in the Valley there’s an indication as to how we used to live. Low slung structures, lots of open space. Cool shade from the towering trees. This is, of course, a rare, precious, disappearing commodity.

In the autumn of 1939 a fellow named P. N. Morgan designed and built a twelve-room, four family residential structure just off Lankershim in North Hollywood, at 10912 Blix. Then, a chap named W. Charles Swett saw what Morgan did, and liked it so much that in the spring of 1940 he pulled permits to put up one very much like it on the adjoining property at 10916, hiring engineer/architect Edward Rudolph to design another one-story, twelve-room four-unit.

Look how nicely the two work together. See how they form a sort of allée, passing through a planted boscage.

10912, left; 10916, right

Needless to say, 19012 was marketed as a development opportunity:

Yeah, you market those condos to the Warner employees.

And the lot, being 57×170, is going to lose any vestige of open space to absorb a five-story, eighteen-unit structure:

Here’s an overhead—that tree canopy is about as dense a green spot as you’ll ever find that close to Lankershim.

Sorry to see them go. But at least we can revel in the irony that it’s the people who yell loudest about climate change are also those who yell loudest about building more housing. Sweet, sweet irony.

And yet… The footprint of the four-unit structure now is 41×80. Were Boyajian & Co. to build on that same footprint, with three stories of four units and two stores of three, up five stories, well, there’s your eighteen units, with trees left intact, and—

Oh wait nevermind, I just found the rendering for the thing. I was right, it eats up every inch:

By the way, proving again that architects always…improve…when making their renderings, it should be noted that in some weird attempt to ameliorate the fact their client is ripping out a whole bunch of mature trees, they’ve invented a bunch of trees for the rendering. Literally none of the trees on the surrounding properties actually exist. Neither does that nice fence, which in reality is chain link, behind which there are no crepe myrtles. They also took out a telephone pole and apparently added an encroaching red tile-roofed structure? I bet those ladies are Warner employees, too.

1138 Wilshire Blvd.

Over in Mid-City, on Wilshire Boulevard near the corner of Lucas Street, there’s an unassuming Late Moderne commercial structure. It was built in the fall of 1951, of precast concrete construction, designed by the architectural firm of McClellan, MacDonald & Markwith, its principal designer being Jack H. MacDonald. Construction was by Buttress & McClellan.

So, as you might imagine, it and its corner neighbors are due to be replaced by a Newport Beach development concern called PacTen Partners (so named because its partners were all athletes at PacTen universities) with 140 luxury condominiums. PacTen have secured financing “from an overseas capital source,” and hired KTGY to design the TOC-benefitting, 185-foot tower.

You know, I hear you say, I don’t, like, get this building. Perhaps it’s not the easiest building in the world to love. But I bet I know who does love it! That nutburger over on Skyscraperpage who kept posting about Jack MacDonald a while back. Who kept going on and on and on and putting up picture after picture after picture of MacDonald-designed Mid-Century commercial buildings. God, what a weirdo.

What I find most charming about this rendering is that they—evidently—intend to remove the “Wilshire Special” streetlamp.

Here’s something else I find pretty amusing. See 1138’s neighbor, the goofy-looking putty-colored 1980s thing? That structure, 1140/50 Wilshire was, in fact, built in 1904. It had a stucco job in 1984:

1140/50 Wilshire was built back when Wilshire Blvd. was still known as Orange Street. Image from the Laskey Collection at LAPL.